Auto-Buy Authors | Top Ten Tuesday

Auto-Buy Authors | Top Ten Tuesday

toptentuesday

Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly meme hosted by The Broke and the Bookish. I’ve ignored the rules a bit this week because I do not have auto-buy authors. I would love it if I did, but I currently have no money, so I’m very nearly on book buying ban imposed by necessity. Instead, I’ve listed ten authors for whom I hope one day to have read every word they’ve published.

  1. Neil Gaiman
    I will probably never manage to read every book this fiction producing machine has published, but I’ll also never stop trying.
  2. Kate Atkinson
    I studied her first novel at school and never looked back.
  3. Maria V. Snyder
    A recent discovery. So far I’ve only read two books, but I will catch up.
  4. Margaret Atwood
    I have more than one of her books in my tbr pile currently, which is normally against my self-imposed rules. I should really get on that.
  5. John Green
    One of the few people on this list whose work I’m actually very nearly up to date with. I’ve read all his novels, anyway.
  6. Cassandra Clare
    I’m currently reading her books more slowly than she writes them, so this could take a while.
  7. Jostein Gaarder
    If any of his books don’t get translated to English I’m screwed.
  8. Marissa Meyer
    I preordered Winter today *bounces*.
  9. Catherynne M. Valente
    I’ve actually only read one of Valente’s books so far, but I’ll get there.
  10. Rainbow Rowell
    I’m up to date with her YA, but have yet to get to her adult work. I don’t know why that is, because Attachments sounds So. Good.

          Bonus: Terry Pratchett
                           Sadly he will never be an auto-buy author because there
                            will be no more books after The Shepherd’s Crown, but I
                            won’t stop until I’ve read every Discworld book there ever
                            was.

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Cress | Review

Cress | Review

spoilerwarning

cress
Star Rating: 5/5
goodreads~buy it

Cress introduces an (almost) new character to the world of The Lunar Chronicles: Cresent Moon. Cress is a programmer, exiled from Luna for the crime of being born without powers and imprisoned in a satellite to do Levana’s dirty work. But she has no reason besides fear to obey the Queen’s commands, so when a chance to escape presents itself, she immediately decides to flee her modern-day tower.
At first, it took me a little while to warm to Cress. Her tendency to hide under things and cry, while understandable given her years of imprisonment and minimal social interaction, got irritating quickly. This wasn’t helped by her gooeyness over Thorne, a man she’d never actually met. However, I began to realise that while she appears weak, Cress is principled and very intelligent, and does what she thinks is right despite being scared. In short, Meyer proves here that she can write a strong female character who isn’t a tomboy, and that’s a rare thing in YA.
This is a retelling of Rapunzel (if you didn’t gather that from the cover), and it stays about as close to the source material as Cinder, and definitely more so than Scarlet. To a certain extent, this gives an indication of the direction the plot is headed, but since this is the third book in the series, the wider story arc is prominent and at least a third of this book doesn’t concern Cress at all.
I really appreciate the way that Meyer is building up her cast of characters over these books. In Cinder there were perhaps seven or eight people the reader needed to remember, and only two points of view, but at this point there are a couple of dozen recurring names, and I think I counted eight perspectives. I did lose track of who people were a little bit, but in general it wasn’t hard to manage, because the introductions have been spread over the series.
Meyer’s writing is consistently strong, generally favouring action and speech over long descriptions, but still painting a clear picture of the environment and characters. I had some trouble picking out quotes which didn’t spoil anything, since the plot moves quickly and several twists occurred fairly early on. My to-do list from the last couple of days is barely touched because things just kept happening and I had to know everyone was going to be okay.
I think this is the strongest book of the series so far, and I want Winter. Now, please.

Quotes
Encircling the planet flickered thousands of tiny dots that indicated every ship and satellite from here to Mars. A glance told Cress that she could look out her Earth-side window right then and spot an unsuspecting Commonwealth scouting ship passing by her nondescript satellite. There was a time when she would have been tempted to hail them, but what would be the point?

“I’ll be nice to her!” said Iko. “I can take her net-shopping and she can help me pick out my future designerwardrobe. Look, I found this custom escort shop that has the best accessories, and some discounted models. What would you think of me with orange hair?” The netscreen on the wall switched to an escort-droid sale listing. The image of a model was slowly rotating, showing off the android’s perfect proportions, peachy skin, and royalty-approved posture. She had purple irises and cropped tangerine hair and a tattoo of an old-fashioned carousel that rotated around her ankle.
Cinder squeezed an eye shut. “Iko, what does this have to do with the satellite girl?”
“I was getting to that.” The screen scrolled through a menu, landing on hair accessories, and dozens of icons clustered together showing everything from dreadlocked wigs to cat-ear headbands to rhinestone-encrusted barrettes. “Just think how much potential she has with hair like that!”

All at once, it dawned on her. She was on Earth. On Earth.
She’d seen pictures, of course. Thousands and thousands of photographs and vids—cities and lakes and forests and mountains, every landscape imaginable. But she had never thought the sky could be so impossibly blue, or that the land could hold so many hues of gold, or could glitter like a sea of diamonds, or could roll and swell like a breathing creature.
For one moment, the reality of it all poured into her body and overflowed.

Fairytale Retellings | Top Ten Tuesday

Fairytale Retellings | Top Ten Tuesday

toptentuesday

Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly meme hosted by The Broke and the Bookish. This week my picks are split between five favourite fairytale retellings that I’ve read and five from my tbr. I’ve stretched the definition of fairytale a bit to include classic children’s books like Peter Pan.

fairy

Books I’ve Read
Wicked by Gregory Maguire (The Wonderful Wizard of Oz)
The Sleeper and The Spindle by Neil Gaiman and Chris Riddell (Sleeping Beauty and Snow White)
Cinder by Marissa Meyer (Cinderella)
Scarlet by Marissa Meyer (Little Red Riding Hood)
Ella Enchanted (Cinderella again)

Books From My TBR
Tiger Lily by Jodi Lynn Anderson (Peter Pan)
The Wrath and The Dawn by Renee Ahdieh (One Thousand and One Nights)
Stitching Snow by R. C. Lewis (Snow White)
Splintered by A. G. Howard (Alice in Wonderland)
Bitter Greens by Kate Forsyth (Rapunzel)

May Book Haul

May Book Haul

maybookhaul

New acquisitions!

Fire Study by Maria V. Snyder
fire study

This is the third book in Snyder’s Study Series, so it’s difficult to say much about it without spoilers. Yelena, former poison taster for the emperor, will be refining the skills she learnt in Magic Study (I’m not going to tell you what they were, but the title is kind of a clue), as well as balancing her life between the land she was born in and the land she was brought up in. In the second book my favourite character was largely absent, so although I enjoyed watching what Yelena was getting up to, I’m hoping he’s back for this one, because I missed him and his excellent snark. This was originally a trilogy, but Snyder has recently continued the series, which is awesome, because it means that I can read this as soon as I like and there will still be more.

Cress by Marissa Meyer
cress

This is another third book in a series, in this case, The Lunar Chronicles. Cress is a computer programmer working for the villain of the series, Queen Levana, and her story is a retelling of Rapunzel. Based on the previous books, I believe that Cress will be joining Cinder, Scarlet and the love interests they’ve collected along the way, and continuing the fight against the Queen and her supporters. As her story gets more involved, I’m interested to see how Meyer balances the fairytale retelling aspects against the sci-fi. Cinder held more closely to Cinderella than Scarlet did to Little Red Riding Hood, and I can understand why that would happen as Meyer’s story continues and gets more complex.

The Girl Who Circumnavigated Fairyland in a Ship of Her Own Making by Catherynne M. Valente
girlwhocircumnavigated

This is the story of a girl called September is taken by the Green Wind to Fairyland, which we can assume she circumnavigates in a ship of her own making. That’s almost everything I know, because that, alongside the title and cover, was enough to convince me that this book needed to be in my life. I imagine it as whimsical and beautiful, like The Graveyard Book, possibly in part because of the Neil Gaiman blurb on the front. I sort of want to read it right now, this second. Since I’m writing this way in advance, I may well have read it by the time you’re reading this.

I Am The Messenger by Markus Zusak
messenger

Ed lives a totally normal life which appears to be headed nowhere in particular, until the day he inadvertently stops a bank robbery. Shortly afterwards, someone starts sending him on missions to people in need of aid. While he’s pleased to be helpful, he’d also really like to know who he’s working for. I bought this book mostly because I really loved The Book Thief. This sounds like something completely different, but since I mostly fell for Zusak’s writing style, I’m happy to give it a go. The synopsis makes it sound a lot lighter than The Book Thief, so I’m not anticipating getting my heart ripped out this time.

Percy Jackson and the Sea of Monsters by Rick Riordan
seaofmonsters

I feel like it’s time to head back and see what Percy Jackson and the other inhabitants of Camp Half-Blood are up to. I haven’t really looked into the plot of this one at all, because I already know that these books are entertaining light reading with satisfying plots and good writing, and that’s all I really need to know to hand over my money.

Saga, Volume 1 by Brian K. Vaughan and Fiona Staples
saga

Everyone has been telling me to read this graphic novel lately. Two people from opposing sides of a war fall in love and have a baby, and chaos and drama ensues. I’ve heard that there’s a space opera kind of feel to this, which sounds like fun, and also that all the characters are well drawn (metaphorically and literally). It sounds sort of Whedonesque, which I can always get behind. I’ve also heard that there’s a lot of adult content, so if this story sounds good to you, use your discretion about whether that’s something you’re comfortable with. I think it’s graphic sexual content, rather than graphic violence, but don’t quote me on that, and look for a second opinion if you need to know. On other hand you might be like me, and count this as another point in it’s favour. Bring on the sexy times!

All the Light we Cannot See by Anthony Doerr
allthelight

I don’t often read straight-up historical fiction, but Regan from PeruseProject loves this book, and it recently won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction, so I thought I’d give it a try. It follows a blind French girl in WWII, and a young Nazi with a special assignment to complete. I think it’s probably going to do irreparable damage to my feels, but I can forgive that because the cover is gorgeous.

Jonathan Strange and Mr Norrell by Susanna Clarke
strange

This is an unusual fantasy book. On the one hand, it’s a meticulously researched historical novel, with footnotes and all, set in England in the early nineteenth century. On the other hand, it’s all about the exploits of a handful of magicians who are not making the slightest attempt to stay undercover, and those footnotes I mentioned refer me to books such as The History and Practice of English Magic, and A Child’s History of the Raven King. Clocking in at over a thousand pages, this is going to take me a while to get through, but it’s got another of those encouraging Neil Gaiman blurbs on the front, and the BBC are about to start airing an adaptation, so I think it will be worth my time.

Seconds by Bryan Lee O’Malley
18630542

Katie’s life was going pretty well, until it… Wasn’t. The world seems to be conspiring against her: her relationships and career are going down the drain. Fortunately, a stranger shows up with some (literally) magic mushrooms that can give her a second chance. But now Katie doesn’t want to stop until everything is not just better, but perfect. This sounds like it’s going to be a cute little book with some important undertones about life and responsibility and mistakes and stuff. Also, it’s extremely pretty. It’s not clear above, but the dust jacket is shorter than the book, and the blue sparkly bit at the top is uncovered. I posted a few naked hardback pictures on twitter.

The Elements of Eloquence by Mark Forsyth
theelementsofeloquence

A lot of the reason I got excited about this book is that it’s so pretty. The gold parts are all raised up from the page, and when you look closely at the green background it looks like leather. The insides are pretty special too, though. Forsyth takes the reader through the rhetorical devices used (consciously) by Shakespeare and (subconsciously) by modern pop stars. Every chapter describes a different device, and gives examples of it’s use.

Ready Player One by Ernest Kline
readyplayerone

I’ve heard a lot about this book, and I don’t think any of it is bad. It’s a sort of mash up of a dystopian and a treasure hunt. In the future, the outside world is more or less destroyed, and everyone lives their lives in an MMO. When the owner and creator of said MMO dies, he leaves everything to whoever can follow the clues he’s left in-game. The book follows a guy whose whole life is about solving this puzzle before somebody else beats him to it.

Chocolate Book Tag

Chocolate Book Tag

I’ve seen quite a few booktubers post this tag and I thought it looked like fun, but it didn’t occur to me that I didn’t have to be on youtube to do it until I saw CKReads‘ post, and it occurred to me that I was allowed too. I can be kind of stupid sometimes. Anyway, nobody tagged me, but I want to play. This tag was created by A Daydreamer’s Rambles.

Dark ChocolateA book that covers a dark topic (abuse, domestic violence, rape, lonlieness, bullying, death, etc)

AGatheringLight

I went through everything I’ve read in the last year or so and I couldn’t find much that dealt with these topics. Well, that’s not true. I read plenty of fantasy books which include pretty much every topic in that list, but I felt like the intention here was to give a contemporary or historical book. In the end, I found A Gathering Light, by Jennifer Donnelly. I read this quite a few years ago now, and I really enjoyed it. There are two plots here, interwoven. One is the true story of Grace Brown who drowned in 1906 under mysterious circumstances. Then there’s Mattie Gokey, the fictional girl who reads Grace’s letters and figures out what happened to her. There’s a whole lot going on here, and it’s hard to know what to mention without giving spoilers, but broadly speaking this book deals with feminism, racism and classism, as Mattie struggles to find her place in the world.

White ChocolateYour favourite light-hearted/humourous read

letspretendthisneverhappend

Jenny Lawson of The Blogess is always hilarious, so I was expecting good things from Let’s Pretend This Never Happened, and it did not disappoint. Somehow, she manages to write about mental illness and her struggles with the way her brain is wired while also making me cry with laughter. It’s full of sentences like this: “I am the Wizard of Oz of housewives (in that I am both “Great and Terrible” and because I sometimes hide behind the curtains).” Love.

Milk ChocolateA book that has a lot of hype that you’re dying to read.
readyplayerone

I’m thinking that you already know what Ready Player One is about, because I feel like the last person in the world who hasn’t read it. Just in case, the basic premise as I understand it is that in the not-too-distant future the world sucks and no one wants to go outside, so everyone lives their lives in an MMO call the Oasis. The creator of this paradise dies, and leaves everything to the person who can solve a quest he’s set up. But it’s also somehow set in the 80s. Somehow. I don’t know. It sounds awesome.

Chocolate with a caramel centerName a book that made you feel all gooey in the middle while you were reading it

eleanorandpark

Eleanor & Park is made of adorableness. The romance is beautifully crafted, it grows at a perfect rate, and I just… ack, yes. This book is like a cosy blanket of cute. Also, the side characters are well fleshed out, and there’s a lot going on in both Eleanor and Park’s lives that they have to work through. Especially for Eleanor, things are not simple.

Wafer-free Kit-KatName a book that surprised you lately

thannameofthestar

I didn’t read The Name of the Star all that recently, but it did surprise me a lot. For some reason I had it in my head that Maureen Johnson’s books would be fluffy and light and heartwarming and stuff. I was disillusioned pretty quickly when people started getting murdered in horrible ways. This was a way better book that I thought I was getting, and I can’t wait for the last book in the series to come out.

SnickersA book that you are going nuts about

cinder

I keep lending my copy of Cinder to people and then getting sad because I can’t lend it to someone else while they have it. I need more copies. Cinderella retelling with cyborgs and androids and a plague and people who live on the moon and YES PLEASE. A random little detail that I loved was that the world is split up into six countries/empires/places ruled by a single government or monarch: the Eastern Commonwealth, which is Asia; the African Union; the American Republic; the European Federation; Australia and… the United Kingdom. I’m not saying I approve of the UK refusing to play with the rest of the continent, but it’s totally what we would do, and it made me giggle.

Hot Chocolate with Cream and MarshmallowsWhat book would you turn to for a comfort read?

Indigo's Star

Indigo’s Star is a book from my childhood which I love as much now as I did when I was 12 and accidentally read it straight through the day I first picked it up. It’s actually the second book in a series, but I was given it as a present and read it first. I love all of the books, but this one is still my favourite. The Casson family live in my heart and comment on my life. They make me feel better. I don’t even really know how to summarise this book. It’s about family and love and art and friendship and bullying and… life. I’ve been known to read this the day before exams when I’m freaking out because it makes me feel loved, and it also makes me feel small in the best way. Like there are far bigger things in the world than this exam, and everything’s going to be okay.

Box of ChocolatesWhat series have you read that you feel has a wide variety and a little something for everyone?

equalrites

It has recently come to my attention that not everybody in the world who reads a lot of books has read the Discworld series. This troubles me greatly. These books are hilarious, clever, realistic (in spite of everything that makes you think they wouldn’t be, like, say, being set on a flat world atop four elephants atop a turtle), and gripping. I’ve put Equal Rites here even though it’s the third book in the series because the first couple are in a slightly different style, and I think this is where Pratchett really hit his stride. You don’t need to read these books in the right order to know what’s going on, but there are recurring characters, which is why I recommend this one: everyone in this book is first introduced here, and they go on to do… well, maybe not great things. Things, though. Lots of things. Sometimes they are good things. Sometimes they are just rude songs about hedgehogs.

I don’t really know who has already done this tag, so… I tag you if you haven’t!

March Wrap-Up

March Wrap-Up

This month I’ve been super busy writing my dissertation and working on my (last ever pieces of) coursework, so I didn’t have much time for reading. So naturally, I read 13 books. I don’t understand how that happened at all. Although I’m ten pages behind with the dissertation, so maybe that goes some way to explaining it. When life gets stressful, I retreat into other people’s lives. It’s sort of reassuring how much bigger their problems are than mine. So, let’s get started with this monster wrap-up! Click the covers for Goodreads links.

therosieeffect
3/5 stars

I wasn’t expecting to read anything before the #ayearathon started on 2nd March, but I picked this up in Sainsbury’s on the first and read it that afternoon. And… hm. I’m not sure what to make of this. I loved The Rosie Project and I was excited for this one, but it was kind of disappointing. On the positive side, it did make me laugh, and I enjoyed the side characters a lot, hence the three stars. On the not-so-positive side, I’m kind of furious with Rosie, and I don’t think that was the author’s intention.

It’s hard to explain why without spoiling the first book, but I’ll see what I can do. Don Tillman probably has Asperger’s Syndrome, although the book never explicitly says so. He struggles to read other people’s emotions, and he figures out which behaviour is socially appropriate by memorising norms. I don’t want to say exactly what Rosie’s relationship with Don is, but they’re close. Now it seems to me that if you’re close to someone who struggles to read people, it’s at best thoughtless and at worst cruel to never ever tell them what you’re feeling and then get upset and offended when they fail to figure out what you wanted from them. Rosie did this for the entire book, as well as deliberately deceiving Don, which was what kick-started the plot. I was supposed to be rooting for them, and by the end I just wasn’t.

On the whole, I highly recommend the first book, but I sort of wish I hadn’t read this one. I preferred my own ideas about what happened next.

dracula thequantumthief

                                        4/5 stars                                             4/5 stars

The are the books I finished during the #ayearathon. I talked about them in my wrap-up of that over here, so I won’t repeat myself. I also started The Silmarillion during that week, but I still haven’t finished it. I’m working on it, slowly.

fangirl
5/5 stars

I LOVE THIS BOOK, I LOVE IT, LOVE IT, LOVE IT! ACK! If you would like some (slightly) more coherent thoughts on Fangirl, I wrote a long review (with well-marked spoilery section) just here.

clockworkangel clockworkprince clockworkprincess

                                     4/5 stars              4/5 stars              5/5 stars

I flew through this trilogy and loved it, but when I try to write about it, I find that I have very few coherent thoughts. I just… angels and demons and hot guys and Victorians and a love triangle that broke my heart and so many things designed to mess with my feels. Clockwork Princess in particular gave me quite the book hangover because I just couldn’t drag my head out of the world. I really want to get to The Mortal Instruments soon, but I’m also kind of scared of what it might do to me…

scarlet
4/5 stars

In February I read Cinder and adored it. (I talk about it a bit in this post, if you’d like to get some idea of the premise of this series.) I rated it 5/5 stars and immediately set about convincing everyone I know to read it, like that quote in The Fault in Our Stars about weird evangelical zeal. In comparison, Scarlet was slightly disappointing, but only slightly. It didn’t blow me away in the same way as Cinder did, and I liked Scarlet less as a main character, but I still enjoyed the book a lot. My favourite chapters, predictably, were the ones that continued Cinder’s story, especially because they also included Captain Thorn. Ah, Captain Thorn… I want one all my own. I think he’s going to feature a lot in Cress as well, and I can’t wait. I also have a vague feeling that I’ve picked up from reviews and such that Cress is going to back at the same standard as Cinder. I hope I’m right.

yesplease
5/5 stars

I listened to the audiobook of Yes Please because I had a vague idea that listening to people read their own autobiographies would be a really good use of the audiobook format. I was right. I’m listening to Tina Fey’s Bossypants now. Yes Please is very, very funny, but also honest and thoughtful. Poehler says she has two phrases she uses in response to ideas. For positive ideas, “Yes please”, which is enthusiastic and also polite. For negative ideas, “Good for you, not for me”, which allows you to decline something firmly without causing offense. Seems legit to me.

theshadowcabinet
4/5 stars

This is the third book in the Shades of London series, which I fell head over heels in love with about ten pages into the first book, The Name of the Star. Of the three that are out so far, that one is probably my favourite, but I love them all very much. Rory is a great protagonist. She’s clever and easy to empathise with, but she also makes impulsive and sometimes kind of stupid decisions which keep the plot moving along. In this book in particular, if she did what she was told then we’d have missed all the action. Almost everything that happens in this book is heavily based on things you don’t find out until at least half way though The Name of the Star, so I can’t really say anything else except that I loved it, and I can’t believe how long I have to wait for the (probably) epic conclusion. Oh, and I love the title. I don’t know how familiar people who aren’t English are with our political system and I don’t feel inclined to explain what The Shadow Cabinet is when wikipedia could tell you better than me, but.. yeah. It’s clever.

holdmecloser
3/5 stars

The thing about this book is that I’m not really sure what the point was. I was really excited to read it, because I loved Will Grayson, Will Grayson and I thought this book would let me see more of that world. And it just didn’t really. It didn’t add anything much that wasn’t in the original book. I think I was looking for the wrong thing. I wanted more of the story and I got the same story again, in slightly dodgy rhyme. I wanted to love it, but I ended up feeling like it was only okay. 3/5 stars because I do love these characters a lot, but this felt unnecessary to me.

oneday
2/5 stars

One Day was definitely my least favourite read this month. What’s the point of a romance book where everyone is consistently miserable (and not even for interesting reasons) for about three-quarters of the book, and then happy for a couple of chapters (but still with a creeping negativity), and then just when you think you’re finally being rewarded for struggling through all the shitty times to get to the good ones, you suddenly hit a clunky plot twist that smacks you around the face, and then everyone’s miserable again until the book ends? I just… no. Not for me. 2 stars instead of 1 because I really liked Emma, although Nicholls didn’t seem to.

Also, this cover makes me angry. I picked this book up from a charity shop for 20p, so I ended up with the film cover. I always post pictures of the version of a book that I own if I can find them, but I wanted to break that rule for this one. This cover is blatantly not as good as the orange one I’ve always seen around before, and just to make that more annoying, there’s a little picture of the good cover in the corner. Why?

thelightningthief
5/5 stars

I was in kind of a bad mood after those last couple of books, and I wanted to pick up something light that I knew I’d enjoy. I’ve been meaning to start this series since I saw the film of this first book about five years ago, and I finally got around to it. I loved it. It wasn’t deep or meaningful or intense, it was just a lot of fun. Likable kids running around being rude to gods and exploding things? I can get behind that. I expected to find Percy difficult to empathise with, since I’m ten years older than him, but that didn’t turn out to be a problem. He’s definitely still a kid, but he’s a smart kid. I fully intend to stick around and watch him grow up.

And… that’s it. The end of the book haul. If you made it this far, you’re amazing. Have a biscuit. Have ten. You’re American? Have a cookie. Whatever. I love you.

March Book Haul!

March Book Haul!

Before you look at the haul below, I’d like to make a couple of points:

1) It’s not kind to judge;
2) There are worse things to be addicted to than books;
3) I fully intend to read every one of these.

Okay, go.

march2015bookhaul

You’re judging me, aren’t you? Well, I don’t care. I have books.

I’m not going to write in detail about every one of these, because there are So. Freaking. Many. I shall just list them, and put GoodReads links in their titles if you’re intrigued.

The Knife of Never Letting Go by Patrick Ness
Every Day by David Levithan
The Maze Runner, The Scorch Trials, The Death Cure and The Kill Order by James Dashner
The Sin Eater’s Daughter by Melinda Salisbury
The Cuckoo’s Calling by Robert Galbraith (J. K. Rowling’s pseudonym)
These Broken Stars by Meagan Spooner and Amie Kaufman
Sex Criminals, Vol. 2: Two Worlds, One Cop by Matt Fraction and Chip Zdarsky
Percy Jackson and the Lightning Thief by Rick Riordan
The Miniaturist by Jessie Burton
All the Bright Places by Jennifer Niven
Code Name Verity by Elizabeth Wein
Shatter Me by Tahereh Mafi
Scarlet by Marissa Meyer
Across the Universe by Beth Revis
Anna and the French Kiss by Stephanie Perkins
Clockwork Angel, Clockwork Prince and Clockwork Princess by Cassanda Clare
The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern
Throne of Glass by Sarah J. Maas
The Rosie Effect by Graeme Simsion

Guys… I have a problem.